Routine Physical Exams

Physical Exams

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Physical Exams For Men


In addition to your annual physical exams that check your blood pressure, blood, sugar levels, and cholesterol other precautionary, preventative routine screenings for men should be carried out.

  • Perform a monthly testicular exam.

  • According to the American College of Gastroenterology people with a family history of colon cancer should begin screening with a colonoscopy by age 50.

  • Have your doctor examine your skin from head to toe every few years if you are under 40, and every year over 40. These routine checks can identify any type of skin problems.

  • According to the American Cancer Society, all men over 50 should have a digital rectal exam and a PSA blood test every single year to screen for prostate cancer. If you have a family history of prostate cancer or run a higher risk, like African-American men, you should begin screening sooner.

    PSA- Prostate-specific antigen

    This is a substance that is released into a man's blood by his prostate gland. The PSA test measures the amount of PSA in the blood. The amount of PSA present in the blood determines the health of the prostate gland. A healthy prostate shows low levels of PSA. When the prostate grows as a man ages, the amount of PSA in the blood normally increases. PSA levels also increases when there is prostate cancer. Having this physical exam done will give some indication as to the health of your prostate.


    Physical Exams For Women


    In addition to your annual physical that checks your blood pressure, blood, sugar levels, and cholesterol other precautionary check-ups should be routinely carried out.

  • Perform monthly breast self-exams. According to the American Cancer Society, women over age 40 should have a mammogram every year. If there is history of breast cancer in your family, you may want to speak with your physician about starting these screenings much earlier.

  • Have a pelvic exam every year as well as a Pap smear to check for cervical cancer. Pap tests are recommended for women who have been sexually active for about three years or when they turn 21.

  • CA-125 Ovarian cancer screening. About 20% of ovarian cancers can be detected in its early stage. Although the Pap test is effective in detecting cervical cancer early, it is not an effective testing for finding ovarian cancer. A simple blood test measures the amount of a specific protein (C-125)in the blood that is increased if ovarian cancer is present.

  • The Breast Cancer Gene Test(BRCA) - This is a test for people with a strong family history of breast cancer or ovarian cancer, and/or for those who already have had one of these diseases. This is not test for cancer itself. By a simple blood test, specific changes in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes can help determine your chances of developing breast cancer and ovarian cancer. A woman's risk of breast or ovarian cancer is higher if changes in the BRCA1 or BRCA2 genes are observed.

  • According to the American College of Gastroenterology women with a family history of colon cancer should begin screening with a colonoscopy by age 50. This routine physical exam can identify any type of potential problems.

  • Have your doctor examine your skin from head to toe every few years if you are under 40, and every year over 40. This can help to identify any potential skin problems.

  • According to the National Institute of Health, women over 65 years should have bone a density test. If you have additional risk factors such as a family history of osteoporosis, history of fractures as an adult, experience early menopause, small, thin-boned, or of Caucasian or Asian descent, speak to your doctor about having a bone density scan.


    Physical Exams For Teens


  • According to the American Cancer Society, about three years after the beginning of sexual intercourse, all women should begin cervical cancer screenings. If you are not sexually active you should begin around age 21.

  • Females, perform monthly breast self-exams. If you are unsure how to, speak to your doctor or your mom.

  • Both males and females, consider getting the vaccine against bacterial meningitis and hepatitis B, especially if you are in college. These are common bacteria that are contagious and are spread through the exchange of respiratory and throat secretions (i.e., coughing, kissing).

  • Females, if you are becoming sexually active, consider getting the vaccine against HPV (Human Papilloma Virus), the virus that causes cervical cancer and genital warts. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the most commonly contracted STD in recent years has been HPV. Thankfully there is now a vaccine available.

  • If you are sexually active, practice safe sex with the use of condoms.

  • Make sure you are up to date on your tetanus shot. A tetanus shot is good for 10 years, but if travel often you should have it every 5 years. Check with your parents to find out the last time you had one.

    Staying informed and physically precautious, allows you the benefit of good physical health. When you are physically fit, you stand a better chance of being able to accomplish all your goals. Knowing the

    physical exams for teens can save your life or the life of someone you know.

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